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Between Light and Shadow: A Twilight Zone Podcast

Craig Beam (My Life in the Shadow of The Twilight Zone) jumps into the Twilight Zone podcast fray with his own unique and sometimes confusing take on the show. There will be swears, and lots of 'ums' and 'uhs.'
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Between Light and Shadow: A Twilight Zone Podcast
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Aug 3, 2019

Is this a podcast about a television series, or a podcast ABOUT a podcast about a television series? Craig takes a deep dive into “Blurryman,” the extremely meta season finale of the 2019 Twilight Zone reboot, then takes a shocking left turn partway through that threatens to change podcasting as we know it forever. Okay, that may be a slight exaggeration. Let’s just say this episode is not to be missed.

 

“Neither Here Nor There (‘Really? Another Revision?’ Revision)” by Twin Loops

TWILIGHT ZONE MAIN TITLE AND END THEMES composed by Marius Constant, performed by Marco Beltrami and Brandon Roberts

“Halloween (Main Theme)” composed and performed by John Carpenter, from Halloween: The Original Motion Picture Soundtrack (copyright 1983 by Varèse Sarabande Records)

Miscellaneous cues from Hangover Square composed and conducted by Bernard Herrmann, from Hangover Square: The Original Motion Picture Soundtrack (copyright 1945 by Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation)

“The Sleeper Car” performed by Thievery Corporation, from the EP .38.45 (A Thievery Number) (copyright 1998 by ESL Music)

 

The Twilight Zone is a trademark of CBS, Inc.

Between Light and Shadow: A Twilight Zone Podcast is a nonprofit podcast. Music clips and dialogue excerpts used herein are the property of their respective copyright owners; we claim no ownership of these materials. Their use is strictly for illustrative purposes and should be considered Fair Use as stated in the Copyright Act of 1976, 17 U.S.C. section 107.

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